Pollinator Partnership is proud to announce that June 17-23, 2019 has been designated National Pollinator Week!

National Pollinator Week is a time to celebrate pollinators and spread the word about what you can do to protect them.

Twelve years ago the U.S. Senate’s unanimous approval and designation of a week in June as “National Pollinator Week” marked a necessary step toward addressing the urgent issue of declining pollinator populations. Pollinator Week has now grown into an international celebration that has extended into Canada, promoting the valuable ecosystem services provided by bees, birds, butterflies, bats and beetles.

POLLINATOR WEEK WAS INITIATED AND IS MANAGED BY THE POLLINATOR PARTNERSHIP.

Celebrate Pollinator Week 2019 with these commemorative tee shirts!

WHY SHOULD YOU CONTACT YOUR GOVERNOR?

WHY SHOULD YOU CONTACT YOUR GOVERNOR?

Many states require in-state requests for events such as Pollinator Week to be officially proclaimed. Thanks to wonderful citizens like you, all 50 states declared Pollinator Week in 2018!

Please take a moment to sign and mail the letter below to your governor. Your effort is making Pollinator Week 2019 a great success!

Has your Governor made a proclamation?

Resources

TOOLKIT

Download the Toolkit for a comprehensive guide to participating in National Pollinator Week. Get activity ideas, social media posts, swag and more!

GRAPHICS

Download and use any of the images below to spread the word on social media, event flyers, or your website.

Facebook Cover Photo

2019 Pollinator Poster

The 2019 poster, Endangered Pollinators and their Habitats, features beautiful artwork by Carol Schwartz. This poster displays the numerous pollinator species that are at risk and listed as federally endangered or threatened including: 1 fly, 3 bats, 5 birds, 8 bees, and 24 butterflies and moths. Disturbances such as habitat loss, climate change, and application of agricultural pesticides contribute greatly to diminishing populations and disrupting ecological interactions. Extinction can lead to a crippling disaster for ecological resilience and economic interests.