September 17, 2020

West Toronto Neighbours Unite to Create Butterfly Habitat

Toronto – West Toronto neighbours are coming together to increase habitat for swallowtail butterflies. Project Swallowtail is a collaborative effort to connect communities street by street and empower neighbours to restore nature in the city by planting native plants, including the trees and shrubs that host the caterpillars of swallowtail butterflies. The project boasts more than 300 participants, including 35 Block Ambassadors, ‘super-volunteers’ who head local teams of friends and neighbours. Click here to read the full release.

September 3, 2020

15 Organizations and Initiatives Helping to Save the Bees

A combination of factors are contributing to the decline of bees, including habitat loss and degradation, pesticide use, the invasive parasitic Varroa destructor mite, and other diseases. The effects of climate change are compounding these stressors on bee populations worldwide. But people around the world are working to create an environment that helps bees thrive. In honor of National Honey Month, Food Tank is highlighting 15 organizations and initiatives working to preserve the livelihood of bees, the ecosystem, and the global food supply. Click here to read the full article.

August 9, 2020

Local Flavour: Youth take the lead in Victoria’s Pollinator Leadership Team

Youth often have unique perspectives on current issues but sometimes don’t have an opportunity to act. I, along with 16 other young people from Greater Victoria, were given a chance to learn about pollinators, and then organize and carry out a pollinator monitoring and outreach project. Click here to read the full article.

July 24, 2020

Victoria among 100 Canadian communities taking part in butterfly project

Victoria is one of more than 100 Canadian communities taking part in the Butterflyway Project, a citizen-led movement to grow corridors — or butterflyways — connecting patches of habitat, allowing pollinators such as butterflies and bees to travel between them. Click here to read the full article.

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